Deliverables


Published Deliverables

To access deliverables just click on the deliverable number

  title deadline task delivered
D01 Kick-off meeting 0 Task0 true
D02 Website 3 Task0 true
D41 Application scenarii and Design of infrastructure. 9 Task41 true
D03 Yearly meeting & workshop 12 Task0 true
D21 Queries based organizations : Notions and Definitions 12 Task21 true
D11 Survey: Weak consistency in social networks 15 Task1 true
D32 State of the art of purpose-based, usage control approaches, and right to oblivion 18 Task32 true
D12 Report: Modular quasi-causal data structures 22 Task11 true
D04 Yearly meeting & workshop 24 Task0 true
D31 Privacy breach scenarios in SocioPlug 24 Task31 true
D13 Report: Protocols for emergent localities 30 Task12 true
D05 Yearly meeting & workshop 36 Task0 true
D22 Queries based organizations : Solutions proposal 36 Task22 true
D23 Queries based organizations : Distributed considerations 36 Task23 true
D34 Report on usage control 36 Task34 true
D14 Report: Prototyping 39 Task13 true
D42 Theoretical evaluation results of proposed solutions 39 Task4 false
D33 Report on purpose-based usage control 42 Task33 true
D35 Report on safety 42 Task35 true
D06 Final open workshop & last meeting 48 Task0 true
D07 Final report 48 Task0 false
D24 Queries based organizations : Experimental evaluation 48 Task24 false
D43 Demonstrator for extracting practical experimentation results of proposed solutions 48 Task4 false

Calendar of deliverable

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Expended list of delivrables

D01

Deliverable description

Code : D0.1

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 0

Description : Kick-off meeting

Concerns : Kick-off meeting

Status : yes


Kickoff documents : Kick-off_meeting

D02

Deliverable description

Code : D0.2

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 3

Description : Website

Concerns : Main_Page

Status : yes


This website ;-)

D03

Deliverable description

Code : D0.3

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 12

Description : Yearly meeting & workshop

Concerns : First annual meeting

Status : yes


Kickoff documents : First_annual_meeting

D04

Deliverable description

Code : D0.4

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 24

Description : Yearly meeting & workshop

Concerns : Second annual meeting

Status : yes


Meeting documents : Second_annual_meeting

D05

Deliverable description

Code : D0.5

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 36

Description : Yearly meeting & workshop

Concerns : Third annual meeting

Status : yes


Meeting documents : Third_annual_meeting

D06

Deliverable description

Code : D0.6

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 48

Description : Final open workshop & last meeting

Concerns : Closing meeting

Status : yes


Document : Closing_meeting

D07

Deliverable description

Code : D0.7

Task / Sub-task : Task0

Deadline : month 48

Description : Final report

Concerns :

Status : no

D11

Deliverable description

Code : D1.1

Task / Sub-task : Task1

Deadline : month 15

Description : Survey: Weak consistency in social networks

Concerns :

Status : yes


This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

hal-01174203

D12

Deliverable description

Code : D1.2

Task / Sub-task : Task11

Deadline : month 22

Description : Report: Modular quasi-causal data structures

Concerns :

Status : yes


This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

hal-01223119

D13

Deliverable description

Code : D1.3

Task / Sub-task : Task12

Deadline : month 30

Description : Report: Protocols for emergent localities

Concerns :

Status : yes



This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

hal-01343348

D14

Deliverable description

Code : D1.4

Task / Sub-task : Task13

Deadline : month 39

Description : Report: Prototyping

Concerns :

Status : yes


Brice Nédelec, Pascal Molli, and Achour Mostefaoui. 2016. CRATE: Writing Stories Together with our Browsers. In Proceedings of the 25th International Conference Companion on World Wide Web (WWW '16 Companion). International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, Republic and Canton of Geneva, Switzerland, 231-234. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2872518.2890539

Abstract. Real-time collaborative editors are common tools for distributing work across space, time, and organizations. Unfortunately , mainstream editors such as Google Docs rely on central servers and raise privacy and scalability issues. Crate is a real-time decentralized collaborative editor that runs directly in web browsers thanks to WebRTC. Compared to state-of-the-art, Crate is the first real-time editor that only requires browsers in order to support collaborative editing and to transparently handle from small to large groups of users. Consequently, Crate can also be used in massive online lectures, TV shows or large conferences to allow users to share their notes. Crate's properties rely on two scientific results: (i) a replicated sequence structure with sub-linear upper bound on space complexity; this prevents the editor from running costly distributed garbage collectors , (ii) an adaptive peer sampling protocol; this prevent the editor from oversizing routing tables, hence from letting small networks pay the price of large networks. This paper describes Crate, its properties and its usage.

See this publication in https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01303333/document

D21

Deliverable description

Code : D2.1

Task / Sub-task : Task21

Deadline : month 12

Description : Queries based organizations : Notions and Definitions

Concerns :

Status : yes


This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

hal-01174205

D22

Deliverable description

Code : D2.2

Task / Sub-task : Task22

Deadline : month 36

Description : Queries based organizations : Solutions proposal

Concerns :

Status : yes



This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link : D23

D23

Deliverable description

Code : D2.3

Task / Sub-task : Task23

Deadline : month 36

Description : Queries based organizations : Distributed considerations

Concerns :

Status : yes



This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

D24

Deliverable description

Code : D2.4

Task / Sub-task : Task24

Deadline : month 48

Description : Queries based organizations : Experimental evaluation

Concerns :

Status : no

D31

Deliverable description

Code : D3.1

Task / Sub-task : Task31

Deadline : month 24

Description : Privacy breach scenarios in SocioPlug

Concerns :

Status : yes


This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

hal-01259061

D32

Deliverable description

Code : D3.2

Task / Sub-task : Task32

Deadline : month 18

Description : State of the art of purpose-based, usage control approaches, and right to oblivion

Concerns :

Status : yes


This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link :

hal-01174210

D33

Deliverable description

Code : D3.3

Task / Sub-task : Task33

Deadline : month 42

Description : Report on purpose-based usage control

Concerns :

Status : yes


Deducing Basic Graph Patterns from Logs of Linked Data Providers Georges Nassopoulos. PhD Thesis. Computer Science [cs]. Universite de Nantes, 2017. English.

Abstract Following the principles of Linked Data, data providers published billions of facts as RDF data. Executing SPARQL queries over SPARQL endpoints or Triple Pattern Fragments (TPF) servers allow to easily consume Linked Data. However, federated SPARQL query processing and TPF query processing decompose the initial query into subqueries. Consequently, the data providers only see subqueries and the initial query is only known by end users. Knowing executed SPARQL queries is fundamental for data providers, to ensure usage control, to optimize costs of query answering, to justify return of investment, to improve the user experience or to create business models of usage trends. In this thesis, we focus on analyzing execution logs of TPF servers and SPARQL endpoints to extract Basic Graph Patterns (BGP) of executed SPARQL queries. The main challenge to extract BGPs is the concurrent execution of SPARQL queries. We propose two algorithms: LIFT and FETA. LIFT extracts BGPs of executed queries from a single TPF server log. FETA extracts BGPs of federated queries from a log of a set of SPARQL endpoints. For experiments, we run LIFT and FETA on synthetic logs and real logs. LIFT and FETA are able to extract BGPs with good precision and recall under certain conditions.

See this PhD document in https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-01536912/

D34

Deliverable description

Code : D3.4

Task / Sub-task : Task34

Deadline : month 36

Description : Report on usage control

Concerns :

Status : yes


Georges Nassopoulos, Patricia Serrano-Alvarado, Pascal Molli, Emmanuel Desmontils. FETA: Federated QuEry TrAcking for Linked Data. In 27th International Conference on Database and Expert Systems Applications (DEXA), 10 pages, Porto, Portugal, September 2016.

Abstract. Following the principles of Linked Data (LD), data providers are producing thousands of interlinked datasets in multiple domains including life science, government, social networking, media and publications. Federated query engines allow data consumers to query several datasets through a federation of SPARQL endpoints. However, data providers just receive subqueries resulting from the decomposition of the original federated query. Consequently, they do not know how their data are crossed with other datasets of the federation. In this paper, we propose FETA, a Federated quEry TrAcking system for LD. We consider that data providers collaborate by sharing their query logs. Then, from a fed-erated log, FETA infers Basic Graph Patterns (BGPs) containing joined triple patterns, executed among endpoints. We experimented FETA with logs produced by FedBench queries executed with Anapsid and FedX federated query engines. Experiments show that FETA is able to infer BGPs of joined triple patterns with a good precision and recall.

See this publication in https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01336386/document

D35

Deliverable description

Code : D3.5

Task / Sub-task : Task35

Deadline : month 42

Description : Report on safety

Concerns :

Status : yes


Emmanuelle Anceaume, Yann Busnel. Lightweight Metric Computation for Distributed Massive Data Streams. Transactions on Large-Scale Data- and Knowledge-Centered Systems, Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2017, 10430 (33), pp.1--39.

Abstract. The real time analysis of massive data streams is of utmost importance in data intensive applications that need to detect as fast as possible and as efficiently as possible (in terms of computation and memory space) any correlation between its inputs or any deviance from some expected nominal behavior. The IoT infrastructure can be used for monitoring any events or changes in structural conditions that can compromise safety and increase risk. It is thus a recurrent and crucial issue to determine whether huge data streams, received at monitored devices , are correlated or not as it may reveal the presence of attacks. We propose a metric, called codeviation, that allows to evaluate the correlation between distributed massive streams. This metric is inspired from classical metric in statistics and probability theory, and as such enables to understand how observed quantities change together, and in which proportion. We then propose to estimate the codeviation in the data stream model. In this model, functions are estimated on a huge sequence of data items, in an online fashion, and with a very small amount of memory with respect to both the size of the input stream and the values domain from which data items are drawn. We then generalize our approach by presenting a new metric, the Sketch-metric, which allows us to define a distance between updatable summaries of large data streams. An important feature of the Sketch-metric is that, given a measure on the entire initial data streams, the Sketch-metric preserves the axioms of the latter measure on the sketch. We finally present results obtained during extensive experiments conducted on both synthetic traces and real data sets allowing us to validate the robustness and accuracy of our metrics.

See this publication in https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01634353/document


Emmanuelle Anceaume, Yann Busnel, Nicolò Rivetti, Bruno Sericola. Identifying Global Icebergs in Distributed Streams. 34th International Symposium on Reliable Distributed Systems (SRDS), Sep 2015, Montreal, Canada. IEEE, pp.10.

Abstract. We consider the problem of identifying global iceberg attacks in massive and physically distributed streams. A global iceberg is a distributed denial of service attack, where some elements globally recur many times across the distributed streams, but locally, they do not appear as a deny of service. A natural solution to defend against global iceberg attacks is to rely on multiple routers that locally scan their network traffic, and regularly provide monitoring information to a server in charge of collecting and aggregating all the monitored information. Any relevant solution to this problem must minimise the communication between the routers and the coordinator, and the space required by each node to analyse its stream. We propose a distributed algorithm that tracks global icebergs on the fly with guaranteed error bounds. We present a thorough analysis of our algorithm performance. In particular we derive a tight upper bound on the number of bits communicated between the multiple routers and the coordinator in presence of an oblivious adversary. Finally, we present the main results of the experiments we have run on a cluster of single-board computers. Those experiments confirm the efficiency and accuracy of our algorithm to track global icebergs hidden in very large input data streams exhibiting different shapes.

See this publication in https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01194511/document

D42

Deliverable description

Code : D4.2

Task / Sub-task : Task4

Deadline : month 39

Description : Theoretical evaluation results of proposed solutions

Concerns :

Status : no

D43

Deliverable description

Code : D4.3

Task / Sub-task : Task4

Deadline : month 48

Description : Demonstrator for extracting practical experimentation results of proposed solutions

Concerns :

Status : no

D41

Deliverable description

Code : D4.1

Task / Sub-task : Task41

Deadline : month 9

Description : Application scenarii and Design of infrastructure.

Concerns :

Status : yes


This deliverable has been published on an open archive. To consult the last version, please follow the link : hal-01168810